Great Benefits of Owning a Pet in Retirement

There’s nothing quite like the joy of owning a pet. It’s no wonder that nearly 62 per cent of Australian households own pets. And while everyone enjoys pets regardless of age, our residents can benefit greatly from owning a pet. Numerous studies have shown that having a pet companion improves overall health and wellness, from lowering blood pressure to reducing the risk of depression.

Here are some other great benefits of having your own furry friend.

They provide unconditional love.
One of the best things about pets is that they provide unconditional love. For those living alone, owning a pet can help prevent feelings of social isolation or depression. Before choosing a pet, make sure to consider the pet’s age and demeanour. Generally, pets with relaxed temperaments align well with your lifestyle and energy levels.

They help keep you active.
Staying active in retirement can be challenging but having a pet keeps you on your toes. There are a lot of responsibilities that come with owning a pet, such as taking them for a walk or feeding them.

They provide emotional support.
Our everyday lives are full of stressors but research shows that people with pets are less stressed than people without pets. In fact, just touching a pet can calm you down, which makes them an instant source of emotional support when you need it.

They can help you socialise.
Having a pet allows you to interact with other people, especially fellow pet owners. There are also numerous pet clubs and meet-ups you can join to find people with similar interests.

They help you gain purpose.
Some seniors may struggle to find a sense of fulfilment that their careers once gave them. Taking care of a pet provides a new sense of responsibility and usefulness, which can improve self-confidence.

Getting a pet: what to consider
Before you adopt your new four-legged friend, make sure you can commit to the responsibility of taking care of a pet. Carefully consider your energy level, experience with owning pets, health issues and your residence’s pet policy. lmportantly, if you already Iive in a retirement village, you will need to check the pet policy to see what you can and cannot do.

You should also look for a pet that fits your lifestyle. For instance, younger pets may be irresistibly cute but they are also very active and require lots of attention and exercise. In addition, cats are more self-sufficient than dogs who might require walks every day.

Living with your pet at Village Glen
Village Glen is of the premier retirement villages in Mornington Peninsula, offering pet-friendly living options for residents. If you would like to know more about our retirement homes, please contact us today.